Philadelphia’s SEPTA Transit Workers Go On Strike…Again

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

It has become a familiar story: Philadelphia’s public transit workers are on strike. At 12:01 am on November 1st, 4,738 unionized employees ceased working after failed negotiations with SEPTA. This is their first strike since 2014–when President Obama himself had to intervene via executive order–and their 10th since 1977, making SEPTA America’s most strike-prone transit agency, with a new strike every 4 years on average. And while the length and magnitude of this strike remains unknown, it is different from past ones in the following way: Philadelphians finally have viable private options to fall back on.… Read more

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Philadelphia Has A Poor Land Use Record–Why Expand It?

[Originally published by Market Urbanism]

 

1. My Forbes article this week is about Mamey, a delicious tropical fruit that is popular in Miami but unknown around the U.S.

2. This week I requested interviews with the executives of Philadelphia’s Redevelopment Authority and its Housing Authority—Brian Abernathy and Kelvin Jeremiah. I said that I was writing an article about both agencies’ recent eminent domain zeal. In case you’re unfamiliar, I’m referencing the PHA’s mass overhaul of the Sharswood neighborhood, and the PRA’s multiple recent attempted takings, all plans that have been documented on this site (here and here). … Read more

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Philadelphia’s Eminent Domain Addiction

[Originally published by Market Urbanism]

 

1. My Forbes article this week draws parallels between the world’s three most notable recent cases of economic collapse–Detroit, Greece, and Puerto Rico.

2. The subject of eminent domain in Philly has been hot recently on this blog, with both Emily and I discussing plans by the city’s housing authority to seize 1,330 properties for a redevelopment plan in the blighted Sharswood neighborhood. We both–along with reader Adam Lang–noted the irony of a government authority wanting to expand its footprint in a neighborhood that it had already destroyed with public housing and property neglect.… Read more

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Philadelphia To Seize 1,330 Properties For Public Redevelopment

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

Along with other ideas that have lost appeal in America, one is the notion that powerful government agencies should master-plan large swaths of cities. While such agencies still play roles in specific redevelopments, they seldom imitate the social engineering found, say, during post-War II “urban renewal.” But this has not stopped the Philadelphia Housing Authority from pursuing a mass eminent domain scheme that will revisit these past mistakes.

On June 18th, city council voted overwhelmingly to allow the Philadelphia Housing Authority to redevelop Sharswood, a blighted neighborhood north of downtown…  [read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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