miami beach

How Far Can Miami’s Beach Development Spread?

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

When people think of Miami’s beach culture, they likely focus on the three miles of shoreline along the heart of Miami Beach. What they may not realize is that this culture is spreading north, to previously suburban areas like Hollywood and Fort Lauderdale. This new growth results from the same secret sauce that has bolstered South Florida at large. These once-mild coastal townships are allowing new people, crafting model public spaces, funding forward-thinking infrastructure, and most importantly, letting builders build. The result is a fast-spreading, vertical brand of urbanism that has become the region’s trademark, and turned it into an ever-growing global destination…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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austin

I Spent A Year Traveling Through America’s Fast-Growing Sunbelt

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

There’s a severe shift occurring right now in the United States. The Northeast and Midwest are ceding people to the South and West, with migrants moving particularly to America’s Sunbelt. Like with other global migration shifts, there is an underlying political context to all this. Regulations on housing construction and other economic activities are making certain northern cities hostile to all but elite income groups. Meanwhile, the more open southern economies are receiving the exodus, becoming more economically and culturally dynamic. For the last year, I’ve traveled through this southern slice of the country, witnessing all these changes at street level–and it’s been something to behold…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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Miami’s Parking Deregulation Will Reduce Housing Costs

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

One of the great thought experiments in modern urban planning is to consider just how much cheaper life would be if the government didn’t enforce minimum parking requirements. Academics like UCLA professor Donald Shoup, for example, have noted that these mandates raise construction costs for housing, retail and office space, especially in dense cities, where building parking is both more expensive and less necessary. For this reason, several cities have deregulated at least certain aspects of their parking codes. Miami has done this for much of its new housing stock, and appears to be reaping the benefits through cheaper and more abundant units…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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The Case For Another Cuban Boatlift

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

On March 21, President Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Cuba since Fidel Castro’s 1959 revolution. The visit will continue his ongoing efforts to normalize relations with the Communist country, in a strategy thought to benefit both sides. For the U.S., normalization could amend ties with an island that, just 90 miles from Florida, has shown past aggression. And for Cuba, it could bring commerce to a poor and confined population. But if the U.S. really wants to uplift average Cubans—while creating economic growth for itself and destabilizing the Castros—it should just help Cubans escape their own country.… Read more

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fidel albelo

What Is It Like To Escape Cuba By Raft?

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

Miami, FL–There are over 1.1 million Cuban immigrants in the United States, and even more than other immigrant groups, they have clustered, with over two-thirds living in greater Miami. What unites this group is not dislike of their home country, but the need to leave the Castro brothers’ Communist regime. Without the money or legal ability to fly out, however, many have risked their lives by floating on man-made rafts to Florida, Mexico and elsewhere. Thousands of these raft people—or “balseros”—are traversing the streets of Miami, carrying a memory that is seldom-discussed in Cuban culture.… Read more

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brickell

Skyscraper Paradise — Miami’s Brickell Should Be Urban America’s Future

[Originally published by National Review]

 

Miami — As someone who has visited every major U.S. city, I can attest that there isn’t another neighborhood quite like Miami’s Brickell. The 1.19-square-mile area south of downtown is the sort of gleaming overnight skyscraper zone that just isn’t built anymore in America. Starting as a low-slung neighborhood, it grew to become what it now is thanks to the city’s tolerance of unfettered growth. And rather than bringing Armageddon, as critics of rapid urban development might suspect, Brickell has become an economic powerhouse and an urban destination.… Read more

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Fisher Island: An Exclusive Paradise 3 Miles From Miami

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

Fisher Island, FL

The South Florida area has many wealthy people, and a lot of them aren’t afraid to show it, whether that means riding large yachts or driving luxury cars whose exhaust pipes wake up the neighborhood. But there is one such enclave that is largely unknown, even to those living in the metro area. It is Fisher Island, an oasis of tropical landscaping and Mediterranean architecture just 3 miles from the shores of Miami…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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America’s Progressive Developers–Carlos Fausto Miranda

[Originally published by Market Urbanism]

 

Miami, FL

Several months ago, I announced the beginning of an MU series called America’s Progressive Developers, which would document the different forward-thinking builders I met while traveling cross-country. The initial one that I’m profiling—Carlos Fausto Miranda—is in many ways a fitting first choice. Just as the MU blog has advocated for innovative, common-sense land use ideas that are seldom actually practiced, Fausto is a young entrepreneur driven more by vision than anything he’s yet built. But he owns many properties, and is waiting for permission from Miami’s city hall to transform them into something special.… Read more

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Look At Uber’s Brilliant New Miami Marketing Ploy

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

Miami, FL

It can be easy to take for granted just how fluid and inventive companies in the U.S. must be in order to grow explosively. For example, the American press, for all its Uber coverage, seldom stops to reflect on all the revolutionary changes the company has produced since its 2009 founding. CEO Travis Kalanick and staff have pioneered mobile technology, analytical mapping and personal car use to transform urban transportation, creating a $50 billion company in the process. But one underrated aspect has been Uber’s marketing savvy, which I was reminded of this morning while driving through Miami…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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Who Are America’s Progressive Developers?

[Originally published by Market Urbanism]

 

Miami, FL

1. I delved into finance this week for Forbes, writing articles about how Chicago’s junk-bond rating is already causing higher borrowing costs; and about how Dodd-Frank, 5 years after passage, is killing community banks.

2. Starting in a few weeks, and continuing for as long as I’m on the road, I will occasionally add to a new Market Urbanism series called “America’s Progressive Developers.” This will profile different developers who have either built, or are planning to build, interesting projects that enliven their city.… Read more

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