mexico

When Texas Stopped Looking and Feeling Like Mexico

[Originally printed in Governing Magazine]

 

The cities along the Texas and Mexico border differ dramatically. Those in Texas are sprawling, while those in Mexico are buzzing with urban vibrancy. This is odd considering that many of these border cities have shared histories and cultures. U.S. cities like Brownsville, McAllen, Laredo and El Paso are demographically similar to their counterparts in Mexico, yet look like classic American Sun Belt cities. Their downtowns are quiet, with automobiles outnumbering pedestrians; interior neighborhoods have single-family homes; and strip malls sprawl into the peripheries.… Read more

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juarez-plaza

Mexico’s Border Cities Have Brilliant Public Spaces

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

Ciudad Juárez, Mexico–When most people think of Mexico’s border cities, they envision violence and drug smuggling. But if you are willing to risk a visit—and, frankly, it doesn’t feel all that risky once there—you’ll find dynamic urban street settings that are largely unsurpassed in America. From almost the second you cross the bridges into these cities, you leave the suburban sterility of the U.S. and enter an oasis of density, mixed uses, and narrow, crowded streets. Central to this atmosphere are the many brilliant public spaces…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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‘Mexican Nationals’ Are Transforming San Antonio

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

San Antonio, TX–The oddest thing about today’s anti-immigration rhetoric, namely against Mexicans, is that it comes during an era when Mexican immigration has declined. According to American Community Survey data compiled by UT-San Antonio public policy dean Rogelio Saenz, “the volume of migration from Mexico to the United States fell from 1.9 million in 2003–2007 to 819,000 in 2008–2012, a drop of 57 percent,” and the decline has continued in recent years. Meanwhile, he writes, the demographic nature of these immigrants has changed.… Read more

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