San Francisco, A Leading Immigrant Hub, Sues Trump Over Sanctuary City Order

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

San Francisco, CA–On January 25th, President Donald Trump signed an executive order stating that so-called “sanctuary cities”–or cities where local government officials choose not to cooperate with federal deportation agents–would lose federal funding. Now San Francisco has struck back, with a lawsuit titled City and County of San Francisco v. Donald J. Trump….[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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austin

I Spent A Year Traveling Through America’s Fast-Growing Sunbelt

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

There’s a severe shift occurring right now in the United States. The Northeast and Midwest are ceding people to the South and West, with migrants moving particularly to America’s Sunbelt. Like with other global migration shifts, there is an underlying political context to all this. Regulations on housing construction and other economic activities are making certain northern cities hostile to all but elite income groups. Meanwhile, the more open southern economies are receiving the exodus, becoming more economically and culturally dynamic. For the last year, I’ve traveled through this southern slice of the country, witnessing all these changes at street level–and it’s been something to behold…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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Globalism — Not Nativism — Is What Made America’s Cities Great

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

Glendale, CA–I could tell when first arriving in Glendale that this wasn’t a stereotypical American suburb. I’d reserved a place here for the Los Angeles portion of my cross-country trip, after hearing that it was a cheap and amenity-rich city close to central L.A. But what has immediately jumped out is the diversity of this 30-square-mile, 200,000-person city, with Hispanic, Middle Eastern, Oriental, European and Caucasus communities functioning side by side. All the same, it’s a thriving city that performs above-average economically and culturally.… Read more

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San Antonio: Growth And Success In The Mexican-American Capital

[Originally printed in the San Antonio Business Journal (paywall) and republished by the Center for Opportunity Urbanism]

 

[Ed’s note: this was part of a larger project by Joel Kotkin’s think tank, the Center for Opportunity Urbanism, to explain the growth of Texas’ cities. Scott’s essay is on pg. 40 of the pdf.]

 

San Antonio, TX — For decades, as many U.S. cities declined, and others became overly exclusive, cities in Texas evolved into places of opportunity. Due in large part to liberalized economic policies, the state’s “Big Four” metro areas — Houston, Dallas, Austin and San Antonio — consistently rank among the nation’s leaders in population growth and job growth, experiencing the rapid urbanization once common among America’s legacy cities.… Read more

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Home, Away From Home

[Originally printed in City Journal]

 

[Ed’s note: my latest piece appeared as a sidebar in a larger print essay by Aaron Renn about the urbanization of Texas. The whole essay is worth reading, since it captures the monumental growth taking place in Texas’ four largest metros.]

Dominated by working-class families who’ve lived in the city for generations, San Antonio has long maintained stable demographics. Many Anglos descend from Texas’s early European settlers, while, contrary to public perception of the city as an immigrant hub, many Hispanics are Tejanos—native Texans of Mexican descent—who were born in the city or in the Rio Grande Valley.… Read more

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San Antonio’s Key to Economic Success: Immigrants

[Originally printed in Governing Magazine]

 

The typical view of an immigrant in this country is not far removed from the image of thousands of people pouring in to Ellis Island in the early 1900s — people with little money to their names and big dreams of making their fortunes in America. That view is still true in many ways, but it’s also true that many of today’s immigrants are well-to-do international elites. For instance, in Miami — long associated with Cubans arriving by raft — there are now a lot of rich South Americans.… Read more

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‘Mexican Nationals’ Are Transforming San Antonio

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

San Antonio, TX–The oddest thing about today’s anti-immigration rhetoric, namely against Mexicans, is that it comes during an era when Mexican immigration has declined. According to American Community Survey data compiled by UT-San Antonio public policy dean Rogelio Saenz, “the volume of migration from Mexico to the United States fell from 1.9 million in 2003–2007 to 819,000 in 2008–2012, a drop of 57 percent,” and the decline has continued in recent years. Meanwhile, he writes, the demographic nature of these immigrants has changed.… Read more

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The Case For Another Cuban Boatlift

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

On March 21, President Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Cuba since Fidel Castro’s 1959 revolution. The visit will continue his ongoing efforts to normalize relations with the Communist country, in a strategy thought to benefit both sides. For the U.S., normalization could amend ties with an island that, just 90 miles from Florida, has shown past aggression. And for Cuba, it could bring commerce to a poor and confined population. But if the U.S. really wants to uplift average Cubans—while creating economic growth for itself and destabilizing the Castros—it should just help Cubans escape their own country.… Read more

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Baltimore Looks To Attract Syrian Refugees

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

The number of refugees escaping war-torn Syria is now 4 million, and the countries most inclined to accept them have been in Europe and Asia. By comparison the U.S.—which has long welcomed refugees, and still allows 70,000 annually from across the globe—has mustered an underwhelming response. President Obama announced last Thursday that the U.S. will receive a mere 10,000 Syrian refugees next year, and the State Department listed 190 cities where they could go. Notably proactive in welcoming them has been Baltimore, a traditionally black-and-white town that has rebranded itself as an immigrant hub…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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Travel Update: A Tale Of Two Latino Areas In Miami And San Francisco

[Originally published by Market Urbanism]

 

Miami, FL

1. The two Forbes articles I wrote this week are about New York City mayor Bill de Blasio’s effort to modernize the city’s courts; and a tech program under New York governor Andrew Cuomo that failed colossally in year one.

2. The highlight of my week, though, came at the tail end on Saturday night, when I explored Miami’s Little Havana, a Cuban neighborhood outside of downtown. What surprised me was how Cuban it actually was, despite abutting one of the nation’s booming financial districts.… Read more

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