austin

I Spent A Year Traveling Through America’s Fast-Growing Sunbelt

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

There’s a severe shift occurring right now in the United States. The Northeast and Midwest are ceding people to the South and West, with migrants moving particularly to America’s Sunbelt. Like with other global migration shifts, there is an underlying political context to all this. Regulations on housing construction and other economic activities are making certain northern cities hostile to all but elite income groups. Meanwhile, the more open southern economies are receiving the exodus, becoming more economically and culturally dynamic. For the last year, I’ve traveled through this southern slice of the country, witnessing all these changes at street level–and it’s been something to behold…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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What Is The Best City In Texas?

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

Throughout my recent stay in Texas, residents would often ask which of its major cities I liked the most–Austin, Dallas, Houston or San Antonio. Residents were curious to hear this, given that I was an outsider living for a month each in all four. They also wanted to know because this is a hot topic in Texas; the four cities have become some of America’s most economically dynamic places, and have ongoing rivalries for food, sports, and cultural cache.

To this point, the question was always less about which city had the best economy, and more about quality of life and street cred–where would I actually want to live?…[read the rest at Forbes]… Read more

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Home, Away From Home

[Originally printed in City Journal]

 

[Ed’s note: my latest piece appeared as a sidebar in a larger print essay by Aaron Renn about the urbanization of Texas. The whole essay is worth reading, since it captures the monumental growth taking place in Texas’ four largest metros.]

Dominated by working-class families who’ve lived in the city for generations, San Antonio has long maintained stable demographics. Many Anglos descend from Texas’s early European settlers, while, contrary to public perception of the city as an immigrant hub, many Hispanics are Tejanos—native Texans of Mexican descent—who were born in the city or in the Rio Grande Valley.… Read more

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Dallas and Houston: Centers For Economic Development

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

Dallas, TX–There is ongoing speculation about how cities can attract economic development, particularly the large-scale kind spurred by corporate relocations. The question is particularly important to public officials, who view such growth as a way to get instant jobs and tax revenue. The answer may lie in the examples of Houston and Dallas, two metro areas that have been among the nation’s economic growth leaders. Their causes for success are multi-faceted, and refute some of the received wisdom, but mostly boil down to their open economies…[read the rest at Forbes]

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plano

The Explosive Northern Growth Of Metro Dallas

[Originally published by Forbes]

 

Plano, TX–The Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex is the second fastest-growing metro in the nation. According to Census figures, from July of 2014 to July of 2015, it added 144,704 people, trailing only Houston. This is nothing new, as Dallas has, along with the other Big 4 in Texas, consistently been among the nation’s 10 fastest-growing major metros for years. But these figures are still just numbers on a page. What does the growth look like in real life? Recently, I spent a day driving through the metroplex’s northern portion, finding it to be endless and explosive…[read the rest at Forbes]

 … Read more

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