Travel Update: I’m Going To Cuba

[Originally published by Market Urbanism]

 

[editors note: I posted this on MarketUrbanism.com last week so people would know I was visiting Cuba. Then I took it down before leaving–and didn’t bother posting it here–because the Castro regime has a record of abusing journalists, and I didn’t want to anger them beforehand. But I’ve returned, and am posting the original version. Needless to say, many of my conclusions after visiting the country are far different than the assumptions expressed below. In coming weeks, I will add numerous photographs, commentary, and articles about my time there.]

 

Miami, FL

1. My two Forbes articles this week included one about how inclusionary zoning has replaced rent control as urban America’s preferred housing price control; and one about how San Francisco’s housing prices are causing creative class exile.

2. There was another interesting recent housing story in San Francisco, when city supervisor David Campos–who represents the Mission District–proposed putting a 2-year moratorium on market-rate housing in the gentrifying neighborhood. While activists support the measure, even San Francisco’s establishment liberals have deemed it counterproductive. Here are formal oppositions published by the San Francisco Chronicle; from the local Democratic Party; and by supervisor Scott Wiener, a renowned affordability champion. Wiener includes in his Medium op-ed a statement that will hopefully one day be read, contemplated, and internalized by every anti-gentrification activist in America:

New residents aren’t moving to the Mission because of new development; rather, they’re moving to the Mission because of the Mission, amazing as it is. People who want to move to the Mission will move there with or without new development. And, without additional housing, they will put more and more pressure on the existing housing stock. Evictions and displacement are the inevitable result of that pressure.

To counter, here’s an editorial by Campos criticizing Wiener for “channeling the ghost of Ronald Reagan.”

3. And yes, you read that headline right–I’m going to Cuba! I’d been flirting with the idea ever since President Obama normalized relations with the nation (just earlier today he removed it from the state sponsors of terrorism list), and being in Miami seemed like an excuse to go. I’m slated to leave early Sunday and return Thursday, June 4.

Traveling to Cuba is still not easy, much less available to the broader U.S. A person must fit one of 12 categories, and they are rather narrow (I qualified as a journalist, and am expected to keep a record of my activities). Few U.S. airlines offer Cuba flights, and the ones that do leave only from select cities. While numerous Cuba travel agencies exist here in Miami, some don’t have a single staffer who speaks English, suggesting that they cater more to Cuban-Americans connecting with their families than gringos. But I wanted to see a country in the final throes of its half-century stagnation, before it inevitably changes from increased tourism and new-found access to U.S. banks. I plan to visit las ciudades de Havana, Trinidad y Santiago de Cuba, while exploring much of the countryside in-between.

I realize that much has been written about the effects of Cuba’s Communist system on its living standards. Two particularly illuminating articles I found were by New York Times columnist Roger Cohen and global traveler Michael Totten, who described what life is like for the many citizens who live on their allotted $20/month. Other journalists have taken a more positive tone by noting that Cuba has full literacy, minimal homelessness, and a relatively efficient health care system. But I’ll suspend judgement until arriving, and don’t know how much I’ll add to the conversation anyway, since I’m only there for 4 days.

One under-represented thing, though, that I’d like to explore is the nation’s reportedly vibrant street culture–and the causes for it. As PlacesJournal noted in an extended essay, Cuba’s urban neighborhoods have not been disrupted in the last half-century by excessive urban renewal, automobile through-traffic, or change in general. This has prevented modernization, but helped preserve their historic character and walkability. Such neighborhoods may be poor, but, as I’ve read and heard from Miami locals, are clean, safe, and full of people, music, and well-defined civic spaces. One doesn’t have to embrace Cuba’s overall political structure to acknowledge that there are probably still design lessons to be learned from its cities, and I’m looking forward to seeing what those are. Hopefully I can report back next week with plenty of photos.